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Christopher Fowler
Posted in
The Arts
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How many ways can you perform it? And why does it periodically take such a grip on Britain? The furore over Benedict Cumberbatch's Hamlet grew to fever pitch this summer, 'To Be Or Not To Be' shunted to the front of the play, then back, and tickets changing hands for absurd amounts. 'Cumberbitches', for God's sake; the word makes me think that all those marches we went on for our sisters' feminist…
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Christopher Fowler
Posted in
Media
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I once watched a sweating comic struggle through a stand-up set in Edinburgh as a woman in the front row called out a label after each joke he told; 'Sexist', 'racist', 'ageist' and so on. With the Edinburgh Festival in full swing how can you be funny in a diverse culture now? In America, a newspaper apologised last Friday for publishing a cartoon that compared aeroplane seating conditions to…
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Christopher Fowler
Posted in
Film
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Well, it's over. Farewell, Hobbitses, and thanks for all the fun. Last night I saw Borimir, Chlamydia, Moulinex, Fafnir, Ariel, Moomin, Thorax Oakenfold and Legoland go into battle for the last time, bringing together an end to a thirteen-year film cycle all the more remarkable for its consistency of tone. This time for 'The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies', they were pitted against each…
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Christopher Fowler
Posted in
Great Britain
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I've always felt an odd connection to the Alan Turing story, mainly because of my father. As a young man he was employed in an experimental research group to try to understand the structure of strengthened glass, to make it and then find a way to seal wiring inside. Valves and wiring were too clumsy and took experts to connect. The idea was to seal the wires in glass tablets and lock them together…
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Christopher Fowler
Posted in
London & The Arts
Danny Boyle has recognised a key element in the Frankenstein myth in his dazzling new production at the National Theatre - it's the only horror novel that has always appealed to women. In the pursuit of science, the Baron can't relate to anything as natural as love and procreation, ultimately proving himself less human than the monster who wants to understand humanity. Elizabeth offers Victor…
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