Title

We Need To Remember How Great America Can Be

Christopher Fowler
14991227_812076470730_5920673489050811935_o An interesting aftermath to the election result that caught everyone out; Trump is not acting as he's meant to, and young people are complaining about notions of dropping the wall and waterboarding. Since when did the young advocate torture? In Ohio State University, young people
are putting up white supremacy posters, as witnessed by my friend Jennifer friend, who lectures there. it's easy to understand why Trump is tempering his rhetoric. He's a businessman, smart in the feral way of businessmen all over the world, self-aggrandising within his own world but made insecure out of it by his lack of intellect, diplomacy and education.
He's out of his league. He's overawed to have been allowed into the inner sanctum, so of course in 90 scant minutes with Obama he agrees concessions, and the same will happen whenever he meets academics, royalty, career politicians and humanitarians. It would be like putting Sarah Palin in a university library and watching her fall silent as she stares at the book spines. The problems will arise when he is faced with other businessmen - lobbyists and invested interest groups, because he'll feel safer and less ignorant with them, and will open the floodgates at the trough. That's when those in the flyover states will be flown over again. There are so many ways in which Americans outclass the British; in their positivism, their determination, their ability to take action, their intellectual rigour, their libertarianism, their capacity for goodness, all the things for which they've been rightly celebrated around the world
- but the world needs to remember this right now. We don't agree with all their interventionist policies or the prevalence of religion, but there is so much to celebrate. And we're in danger of forgetting. Today's UK Sunday Times had sneering knee-jerk jabs at the USA. Who are we to judge? The idiots who put up racist posters in Ohio will always be in a minority of haters. As in the UK, half the country did not vote for protectionist, racist policies. That's the half we should remember now and celebrate. It's time for solidarity, not condemnation.

Comments

Vivienne (not verified) Sun, 13/11/2016 - 12:20

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Agreed. Although I still wish Brexit will go away somehow, Trump is there and must be accepted. Whether his educated advisers can get him onto a better track remains to be seen, but I saw a report on his body language when with Obama and he was said to seem 'fearful'. I do believe he doesn't know what he has got himself into. It's no longer TV where they can edit stupid bits and, being so fond of himself, I think he'll slowly learn not to be too idiotic and speak without thinking. Perhaps this will reduce him to silence! Young America should start thinking about 2020, as should we.

Wayne Mook (not verified) Sun, 13/11/2016 - 14:35

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

While in this year in the UK a right wing terrorist murdering an MP, how soon the press forgets. In fact northern Europe terror attacks have been by right-wing groups.

I'm not happy Trump won, but 'll wait and see what he actually does. the campaign was pretty nasty on both sides and the rhetoric on both sides I thought was ill judged. It will be interesting how he treats the FBI, with some many differing dealing with things I wonder who will run is 'bad immigrant' strategies. How will big business react, tech is down, but many of them out source their products, like Apple in China, it will be interesting to see how this ties in.

The wall with Mexico would make little difference, but what he'll do to the Nafta agreement will see what he means to do. It stopped government interfering with trade between US, Canada and Mexico, the down side was forcing Canadian health care to by products against the government wishes even though there were cheaper alternatives but it also allows Mexico to trade with Cuba without US government interference. It's a powerful tree trade agreement that has had some unforeseen consequences.

Wayne.

Wayne Mook (not verified) Sun, 13/11/2016 - 14:39

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Sorry murdered, not murdering, I was paying attention to a force of nature, a four year old, sorry about the spelling and grammar, maybe I'll get I'll right.

Wayne.

Sally Erickson (not verified) Sun, 13/11/2016 - 15:09

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Hillary won the popular vote by over 2,000,000 votes at last count. Unfortunately, Trump won the electoral college vote. It is a crazy system and I wish we could get rid of it. The same thing happened to Al Gore. This is a big reason so many of us feel disenfranchised. The ultra right haters are all trying to find a place in the Trump administration. I fear for the future.

Steve Nagel (not verified) Sun, 13/11/2016 - 15:18

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

To clarify: Columbus University is an unaccredited distance education institution that has been based at different times in Louisiana and Picayune, Mississippi. Not to be confused with Columbia University, one of the best in the US.

Vivienne (not verified) Sun, 13/11/2016 - 19:58

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I thought I could be strong, but the sight of Trump and Farage grinning together makes me seek hibernation.

Helen Martin (not verified) Sun, 13/11/2016 - 21:13

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

We were reminded in church today that we have people with American citizenship in the congregation and we don't know how they feel about the results so we should be polite. Since they haven't any of them been proselitising during the campaign that's fine, but that's a knife that cuts both ways, of course. I would hope that things will settle down in the actual US and everyone will follow that advice and be polite. It would be a good start for a tense 4 years.
The problem isn't having a "prevalence of religion" but of the kind of religion. The people who frighten us all are the ones who are arbitrary about everything: their politics, their religion, their sociology, their charity.

Stephen Winer (not verified) Sun, 13/11/2016 - 23:56

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Actually, the real numbers don't break that way. Nearly half the population didn't vote at all. Add that to the Trump voters and, as an American, i find it deeply sickening.

Karyne Corum (not verified) Thu, 17/11/2016 - 15:03

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Speaking from across the Pond, thank you deeply for the kind observation on what can still be goodness found in our nation. The majority of us are horrified and furious that this fascist has risen to power. But we are not going to sit and take it, we are not going to just "be". Sadly it took this to awaken so many of us, but we are awake and we are going to organize and fight back. I just finished reading The Burning Man and it was ironic how close it was to the times we are living with now.

Leslie (not verified) Thu, 17/11/2016 - 15:07

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Among the finer qualities of my fellow Americans, the ability to say, "Sorry, I was wrong." isn't actually very high on the list. After Brexit, there seemed to be quite a few Brits who said, "Sorry! I didn't mean to vote for THAT." Americans have greater sticktuitiveness for our errors. After electing Trump, there's been a surge of triumphalist acting out. Buyer's remorse may hit some folks later, but even then it won't be made very public. There are, instead, a lot of vituperators blaming other people (various targets) for this result. Because we do blame very well in America. It's what got Trump elected. (And then there are my amazing colleagues in social justice organizations, who are hustling to figure out how best to protect the newly vulnerable. I think the good will ultimately pull through, but too many people will be hurt first.)

Leslie (not verified) Thu, 17/11/2016 - 15:09

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

My solace since the election, by the way, has been reading _Nyctophobia_, which is entirely lovely, intriguing, and creepy.

Wayne Mook (not verified) Fri, 18/11/2016 - 00:39

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Nyctophobia, is a superior haunted house story. I really enjoyed it.

hopefully this will be the wake up call the power that be realise that they need to look at the whole of society and not just money interests and the small areas that they think create swing votes, here is hoping.

Wayne.