Blog / 2013

Christopher Fowler
Posted in
London
Yesterday I went to see the Cheapside Hoard at the Museum of London. In 1912, labourers on a building site in Cheapside in the City of London unearthed a great trove of gemstones and jewels which had lain undisturbed for some three hundred years. Known and celebrated as the Cheapside Hoard, it is still the largest cache of its kind to have been discovered. These objects, dazzlingly beautiful…
5 comments
Christopher Fowler
(Mr Arthur Bryant on the subject on carrying on) 'You could smarten yourself up a bit. You have new bosses now. It's important to stay on top of things.' 'And how am I supposed to do that at my age?' cried Bryant indignantly. 'I'm not fashionable. I'm not technical. I'm not meant to be there. I'm not even meant to be here.' Alma sat on the edge of the bed. Bryant pulled at the duvet, resenting the…
6 comments
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
London
It was the Curious Incident of the Ceiling in the Evening Performance, when a bit of it fell on the heads of the audience in the balcony of the Apollo Theatre in Shaftesbury Avenue - but it was reported by even usually staid sources as an apocalyptic nightmare. Although quite a few people suffered injuries, no-one could decide on the numbers - was it 50, 60 or 75? As the timeline rolled out, the…
10 comments
Christopher Fowler
Since 2008, when I started running this pub punch-up of a site (as well as posting on Twitter, Goodreads and two separate Facebook pages, I'll have you know) I've just realised that I've managed to clock up more than 3,000 separate pieces, usually posting at least one a day unless I'm travelling somewhere without technology, like Wales. The amount of time it takes out of my day means this is a…
12 comments
Christopher Fowler
Remember the eighties? If you do, you'll either recall a halcyon era awash with 'Loadsa Money', glass winebars and bad hair or a morally bankrupt time of tastelessness, selfishness and appalling greed. And for London, those times are clearly back again. Although this time around, there are a couple of new twists. It's no longer about selling off the family silver in the form of privatising public…
1 comment
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
London
Londoners tend to think of the city's oddest corner, Mayfair, as the home of embassies and billionaires, and leave it well alone. The only time I ever seem to cross it is when I'm a/ heading to the dentist, b/ taking a wander down Bond Street or c/ cutting through on my way to the Lebanese and Iranian restaurants of the Edgware Road. There's Park Lane, of course, but who in their right mind ever…
Tags:
Mayfair
13 comments
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
London
Most views that tourists assume to be very English have, in fact, been massively tampered with. Bankside had a power station plonked onto it, but a couple of 450 year-old houses survived by themselves by Cardinal Cap Alley. There's a rather good book on the subject called 'The House by the Thames, and the People Who Lived There', by Gillian Tindall, one of my favourite London writers, but anyone…
4 comments
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
London
I'm in Berlin today — I only ever seem to be in Berlin in winter, and yes, it's minus something and trying to snow, which will devolve to a point where I end up standing in Alexanderplatz in horizontal icy rain without adequate clothing, wondering whether I still have ears. What to do, shall I visit the museum that promised to show me the complete history of East German motorcycle production, or…
9 comments
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
London
Some time back I posted about trying to find the author of a book I owned as a teenager. The author's brilliant first novel 'Here (Away From It All)' received wide praise from Anthony Burgess, the New York Times and others, but when I tried to track her down the trail ended in Australia. When I asked readers of The Independent to help me locate her, I received a letter which began; 'My first…
Tags:
Polly Hope
6 comments
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
London
As the city homogenises, we're gradually losing the mysterious nooks and corners that made each London street so fascinating. Here's one I lived near for years without ever exploring. I knew that one of the houses was lived in by the seventies singer Lynsey De Paul, but no-one ever seemed to stay very long in them. They're tiny, listed, and apparently let in very little light. But now, of course…
10 comments

Years