Blog / 2013

Christopher Fowler
Posted in
Reading & Writing
There are lots of new cinema books out at the moment, although it seems the taste for tell-all biographies (once the genre's main staple) is dying out, to be replaced by old-school coffee table volumes. Here are a few you may be interested in. In 'Rosebud Sleds And Horses' Heads' Scott Jordan Harris explores film's most evocative objects. It's a nice idea and the text is pithy, but the items feel…
2 comments
Christopher Fowler
Every writer has projects that didn't happen filed in his drawer. I have quite a few, and over Christmas, I threw out some that I knew would never get realised. But there were a few I couldn't bring myself to get rid of. The funny thing is that most were written as hobbies, something I felt like doing without thought of recompense. Among the film scripts I hung onto was the one for 'Rainy Day Boys…
7 comments
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
Reading & Writing
I recently wrote a short story for... Fearie Tales: Stories of the Grimm and Gruesome It's a compendium of traditional tales and their modern counterparts, edited by Stephen Jones. Here's a bit of a review (I've lost the details of where it came from): 'As with any anthology of fiction, there are always one or two stand-out pieces. With Fearie Tales, the stand-outs are absolute gems, amidst a…
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Fearie Tales
4 comments
Christopher Fowler
This week I'm researching again, and wondering just how much of a plot I really need in a book. It's often been pointed out that the most important part of the Bryant & May novels isn't the storyline. This is becoming an increasingly conscious decision on my part. Few of us remember the identity of the killer in murder mysteries. There's an old rule of thumb about whodunits; the murderer is nearly…
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storylines
9 comments
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
Reading & Writing
It's a known fact - series sell. My career could best be described as 'jobbing writer', with no too books the same except the Bryant & May series, and no reaction as strong from readers except in that series. So the thinking is, maybe I should do another series. Fun though they were, books like 'Psychoville' and 'Hell Train' don't make series. However, 'Plastic might. I had a lot of fun writing it…
24 comments
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
Reading & Writing
The modern mantra is to say that globalisation has shrunk the world, turning cities into identical reproductions of each other, but I'm starting to wonder if that's true. I make it a habit to regularly check out American and English Top 50 book lists and compare them, to try and gauge what we're all reading, but recently I've been surprised by the widening gulf between our cousin-countries and…
12 comments
Christopher Fowler
So, here's the latest rough of the cover artfor my 2014 haunted house thriller, Nyctophobia. Why do so many suspense and horror films take place in virtual darkness? I've always found the dark a cliche, probably because I was never very bothered by it. However, an early movie, 'Wait Until Dark', did scar me as a kid, to the point where I made woodcuts of Alan Arkin in my art class at school just…
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Nyctophobia
3 comments
Christopher Fowler
Guillermo Del Toro's wonderful new book has a forward by James Cameron and an afterword by Tom Cruise, and me in it somewhere toward the end. This is the poshest company I've ever been in. I was surprised to find myself in 'Guillermo del Toro's Cabinet of Curiosities' because the fantasy director's notebooks, interviews and acquisitions cover the eight films he has made so far; Cronos, Mimic, The…
1 comment
Christopher Fowler
Another reader has asked about the strange relationship of my earlier novels to the Bryant & May series. Let me see if I can untangle this particular rat king and make some sense of it all. In the beginning was Sergeant Ian Hargreave, who turned up in 'Roofworld', along with Butterworth, his sidekick, who suffered Diminished Spatial Awareness, based on a friend of mine. This character became Colin…
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Bryant & May
16 comments
Christopher Fowler
Posted in
Reading & Writing
I overheard this on the tube yesterday. 'I was hosting a health talk show, sort of like Dr Miriam Stoppard, and I'd taken so many pills I had no idea what I was saying.' 'Oh? I trod on her foot once, you know.' I love overhearing odd snippets of conversation. Joe Orton was famous for making notes on buses as he listened in to his fellow passengers. He once overheard two women complaining: 'There's…
4 comments

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