Bryant & May Locations

Bryant and May

In ‘Bryant & May and the Invisible Code’ Arthur Bryant and his landlady Alma Sorrowbridge move into a new flat and Arthur immediately manages to upset his next-door neighbor.

It always helps to visualize these scenes if I know the exact location where they take place, so I selected the mansion block at number 17, Albion House, Harrison Street, Bloomsbury.Here’s a new shot of the actual block they move into.

13 comments on “Bryant & May Locations”

  1. Nostalgia.Detected says:

    I love to go looking for places mentioned in novels! Is there a Bryant and May map?

  2. Dan Terrell says:

    Second the Bryant & May map.
    I suppose the flap arose from Arthur’s having Alma install bookshelves on a common wall late into the night.

  3. Martin Gore says:

    Head over to http://www.peculiarcrimesunit.com and click on “The Maps” link for maps. Get them before Admin closes the site down due to spamming issues (I seem to recall an earlier post about closing the PCU site).

  4. Nostalgia.Detected says:

    Thank-you! I had a feeling I’d seen something else about locations. The idea of interactive add-ons to the books really appeals to me – i.e. a location is mentioned in the book and you can come to the website and look at a map and perhaps find out some more about the history etc of the area. Or perhaps you can remind yourself about a character’s background and how they fit in to the overall series.

    Here’s the discussion about closing the Peculiar Crimes Unit http://www.christopherfowler.co.uk/blog/2012/01/20/time-for-a-change/

    I’d love a forum but I realise it’s a lot of work for someone. Being able to comment on the Blog is great and conversing directly with an author is something special isn’t it!

  5. Gretta says:

    Somebody has mentioned previously they’d like to see a sort of B&M walking tour type book, I’d love that, too. With loads of pictures and historical tidbits, obviously. Just in your own time, admin… 😉

  6. madmary says:

    I thought they were moving into council property? Are these flats council? They look very nice.

    Mary

  7. admin says:

    Yup, these are council.

  8. Helen Martin says:

    I told my son that I was examining the neighbourhood and so on when I read Full Dark House and got the response that I should never mind the research, just read the thing and enjoy it. Walking the street (in Google Earth) is still a lot of fun when you can’t actually be there. With Admin you know that the place is there.

  9. Helen Martin says:

    I told my son that I was examining the neighbourhood and so on when I read Full Dark House and got the response that I should never mind the research, just read the thing and enjoy it. Walking the street (in Google Earth) is still a lot of fun when you can’t actually go there. With Admin you know that the place is there to be found.

  10. Dan Terrell says:

    That’s one of the great treats you get with our host’s writing. He knows the locations where he places his stories. He must have many books, phamplets, maps, photos and his own history to draw on. Photos are particularly helpful. I’ve just started reading “Soho Black” and will see what I can find on that square mile (our host’s measure.}
    If you have not visited Admin’s PCU website, take a look. He gives lots of background, has some annotated maps based on GoogleEarth, and many things of interest. Check out his piece on Arthur’s bookshelf, and also how he came to create his characters.
    As to ‘never mind the research’ oh no, no, no. The wife and I love books with foreign settings, particularly places where we’ve been. When we’re reading along and suddenly we hit a wrong word, language, food, street or what have you, the story is badly dinged, if not sent down in flames. The suspension of disbelief is torn.
    Foreign language use is a particular hazard for a writer. How many times have I read that Afghans speak Arabic? Not so. An Afghan is an Afghan, an Afghani is the money, Afghans speak Dari, Farsi, Pushtu or a “slop-over” language from a bordering country, or a tribe that’s split between Afghanistan and Russia.
    Another favorite of mine, gone into the beyond, is Ed McBain. He was great writing about the 87th set in Isola, more or less New York City and its near-burbs, but then late in his career {he was deathly ill and earned a Pass) he made some glaring errors, including having a typical Afghan who – Wait for it – spoke – Buckle up – Arabic. NO; probably not even in the mosque.

  11. Gretta says:

    Dan, just so as you know, I have every intention of purloining the term ‘slop-over’. 🙂

  12. Alan Morgan says:

    Heh, it’s not actually a law that council property comes with a free mattress burning in the front yard and your very own goblin playing five-fingered shuffle by the bins, madmary. I live in social housing, three bedroom house, right on the fells/mountains, and very affordable it is too. We almost never find a ratboy having a pooh in the sink and often go a whole week without the windows breaking due to unmarried mothers tossing needles at hooded youths high on glue.

    Mind you, when I lived in the Elephant & Castle…

  13. Helen Martin says:

    Here in Burnaby there are houses which have historic (relative word on this continent) interest but which are not special enough to be a museum or such. The municipality owns some and rents them to worthy people but with some caveats (no sublets, no wild parties and you have to maintain them). These are quite lovely places, but it’s not easy to qualify. (Pets? Destructive children? Substance abusing relatives who visit? Gang member friends?)

Comments are closed.